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Measures from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework, England - 2015-16

23:30 May 26, 2017 - 09:30 October 05, 2016
Publication date: October 05, 2016
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Summary

This report provides the findings from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF) in England for the period 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2016. The ASCOF draws on data from a number of collections; details of these data sources and which measures they are used for can be found in the Data Sources chapter within the report.

The ASCOF measures how well care and support services achieve the outcomes that matter most to people. The measures are grouped into four domains which are typically reviewed in terms of movement over time.

ASCOF Indicator 1J (26/04/2017)

The existing ASCOF Indicator 1A (Social Care related Quality of Life) tells us about the current (care-related) quality of life of people using social care.  Following discussions in 2011 at the Outcomes and Information Development Board (OIDB), it was agreed that the Department of Health would commission a research project from the Quality and Outcomes of Person Centred Care Policy Research Unit (QORU) to develop a ‘value added’ measure of social care-related quality of life.  This indicator, to be known as ASCOF Indicator 1J, will form part of the 2016-17 framework.

The summary paper below (IIASC Report Summary 2015-16) describes the background, methods and results of the QORU study; the application of this calculation to existing data flows to derive aggregate local authority-level data; and the interpretation of these individual and aggregate measures, again drawing on the QORU study. A dataset of local authority data (based on 2015-16 Adult Social Care Survey Submissions) is provided (IIASC Dataset 2015-16) along with a calculator (IIASC Calculator 2015-16) to enable councils to calculate and analyse their individual-level scores using their own 2015-16 ASCS data return.

For further details, QORU’s papers detailing the conclusions of the research and development phase of their work can be found via the 'Related links' section below.  Any queries or comments should be directed to ascof@dh.gsi.gov.uk in the first instance.

ASCOF Interactive Report (26/04/2017)

An ASCOF Interactive Report is now available in the "Related links" section of this publication page. The report allows local authorities to view their 2015-16 ASCOF measures alongside England, regional and council type averages. Peer group information is also provided to enable local authorities to view their scores alongside their 15 comparator councils. The report is built on the CSV file which is available in the "Resources" section below.

Note (26/04/2017)

Southampton City Council has confirmed that data they submitted in relation to the Adult Social Care Survey, 2015-16, has subsequently been found to have contained errors, with the same response data being used for a number of the questions.  The following should therefore be noted: • The results published for Southampton City Council for the following questions, as well as their associated ASCOF indicators, are inaccurate and should be disregarded in any analysis that includes Southampton City Council: 5a, 6a, 7a (ASCOF 4A), 8a (ASCOF 1I1), 9a, 10, 11, 12 (ASCOF 3D1), 13, 14a, 14b, 15a-d, 16a-d, 17, 18, 19, 21 and 22. • Additionally, ASCOF indicator 1A, which is constructed using questions 3a, 4a, 5a, 6a, 7a, 8a, 9a and 11, is also impacted by this error • Southampton City Council, as part of their internal reporting and governance, has reconstructed their 2015-16 ASCOF indicators and these are available for review at http://www.southampton.gov.uk/council-democracy/council-data/council-performance/default.aspx • The following questions (and ASCOF indicators) are unaffected: 1 (3A), 2a, 2b, 3a (1B), 3b, 4a, 7b (4B) and 20 and the impact at national level for all questions is minimal.

Key facts

 
4B: The proportion of people who use services who say that those services have made them feel safe and secure
  • In 2015-16, 85.4 per cent of service users in England reported that the services they received helped make them feel safe and secure. This is a statistically significant increase compared to the 84.5 per cent reported in 2014-15.
2C: Delayed transfers of care from hospital, and those which are attributable to social care or jointly to social care and the NHS, per 100,000 population
  • 12.1 adults per 100,000 population in England experienced a delayed transfer of care in 2015-16, with 4.7 per 100,000 of these being attributable to social care or jointly to social care and the NHS.
  • The rates of delayed transfers of care, and those that are attributable to social care or jointly to social care and the NHS, have risen each year from 2013-14.
1B: The proportion of people who use services who have control over their daily lives
  • In 2015-16, 76.6 per cent of service users in England reported they have control over their daily lives. In 2014-15, this figure was 77.3 per cent.
  • Although this change is not statistically significant, the proportion of respondents who stated they had ‘no control over their daily lives’ (in response to the same survey question), increased from 5.1 per cent in 2014-15 to 5.6 per cent in 2015-16. This was a statistically significant change.
1I: Proportion of people who use services, and their carers, who reported that they had as much social contact as they would like
  • In 2015-16, 45.4 per cent of service users in England reported they had as much social contact as they would like. In 2014-15, this figure was 44.8 per cent.
  • Although this change is not statistically significant, the proportion of respondents who stated they had little social contact and feel socially isolated (in response to the same question) increased from 5.1 to 5.6 per cent. This was a statistically significant change.
  • Furthermore, the proportion of respondents reporting they had adequate social contact in 2015-16 (32.6 per cent) represents a statistically significant reduction compared to the 33.6 per cent reported in 2014-15.

Resources

Coverage

Date Range: April 01, 2015 to March 31, 2016
Geographical coverage:
England
Geographical granularity:
Councils with Social Services Responsibilities

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