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Alcohol-related liver disease: new map highlights regional hotspots

• National average equates to just over 200 hospital admissions every week

*HSCIC must be quoted as the source of these figures

*Regional figures are available

Areas of the North West and North East of England have the highest rate of emergency hospital admissions for alcohol-related liver disease in the country, new figures show.

The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) has today published a regional map of emergency admissions per 100,000 of the adult population alongside new data at national, Area Team and Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) level.3

The provisional data shows that nationally, hospitals admitted 10,500 cases of alcohol-related liver disease between April 2013 and March 2014 - equating to just over 200 admissions a week.

Regionally, the Area Teams with the highest rate of emergency hospital admissions among the adult population in the same time period were:

  • Greater Manchester at 45.8 admissions per 100,000 of the population (1,010 admissions in total - or just over 19 per week on average)
  • Merseyside at 41.3 admissions per 100,000 of the population (414 admissions in total - or about eight per week on average).
  • Lancashire at 38.9 admissions per 100,000 of the population (472 admissions in total - or about nine per week on average).

The Area Teams with lowest rate were:

  • Bath, Gloucestershire, Swindon and Wiltshire at 14.7 admissions per 100,000 of the population (182 admissions in total - or just under four per week on average).
  • Wessex at 14.7 admissions per 100,000 of the population (330 admissions in total - or about six per week on average).
  • Hertfordshire and the South Midlands at 15.1 admissions per 100,000 of the population (335 admissions in total - or about six per week on average).

HSCIC chair Kingsley Manning said: "This map paints a powerful picture of one of the many impacts that alcohol has on patients and the NHS in this country. This one image depicts what the hundreds of rows of data published today mean for different areas of England.

"While many will be familiar with the HSCIC's annual alcohol statistics, fewer people may be aware we also publish a myriad of different health and social care indicators about different conditions and care on a regular basis.

"The data we have presented today about alcohol related liver disease is the first such provisional data for 2013/14 to be published at such a local level. It should act as basis to help the NHS commission services effectively."

pdf icon Figure 1: Map to show emergency admissions for alcohol related liver disease [27kb]

To view the figures on an interactive spreadsheet visit http://www.hscic.gov.uk/pubs/ccgindsep14 

ENDS


Notes to editors

1. The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) was established on April 1 2013 as an Executive Non Departmental Public Body (ENDPB). It is England's trusted data source, delivering high quality information and IT systems to drive better patient services, care and outcomes. Its work includes publishing more than 220 statistical publications annually; providing a range of specialist data services; managing informatics projects and programmes and developing and assuring national systems against appropriate contractual, clinical safety and information standards.

2. These data are based on the GP-registered counts of patients aged 19 and above and not the population as a whole. The indicator estimates have been standardised, meaning the attributes of different areas - such as age and gender - have been adjusted for in order for comparisons to be made.

3. 95 per cent confidence intervals are presented alongside estimate rates to give an indication of the reliability of the estimate. This means that 95 per cent of the time we would expect the true rate to lie between two limits (an upper limit - e.g. 60, and a lower limit, e.g. 40), with the estimated rate somewhere between (e.g. 50). If the confidence intervals of one organisation overlap with those of another (e.g. Body A has lower and upper limits of 10 and 30, and Body B's limits are 20 and 40) it means that one Body cannot be classed as having a higher or lower true rate than the other.

4. Figures above 10,000 in this press release have been rounded to the nearest 100. Exact numbers are available as part of the data release on the HSCIC website.

5. 'Admissions' refers to the total number of emergency finished admission episodes . Please note that these data should not be described as a count of people as the same person may have been admitted on more than one occasion.

6. Data are provisional.

7. Data are presented by either Area Team or CCG of responsibility, which means that the count of hospital admissions relates to patients registered with GP surgeries within the respective area. This does not necessarily reflect where the patient was treated or lived.

8. For media enquiries please contact media@hscic.gov.uk or 0300 30 33 888. Please note our new media line number.

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