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Personal Social Services Survey of Adults Receiving Community Equipment and Minor Adaptations – England, 2009-10

13:13 June 28, 2017 - 09:30 December 10, 2010
Publication date: December 10, 2010
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Summary

The User Experience Survey Programme operates on an annual basis and is used to target areas of particular interest within Adult Social Services. Opinions are sought over a range of service areas to gain an understanding of service users' views rather than measuring quantities of care delivered.

This particular survey is targeted at service users aged 18 and over receiving community equipment or a minor adaptation funded wholly or in part by Social Services, and aims to learn more about whether or not the community equipment or minor adaptation is helping them to live safely and independently in their own home.

Key facts

  • 43 per cent of service users who responded said that they were extremely satisfied with their most recent piece of equipment or minor adaptation which is an increase of 1 percentage point since 2007-08. 34 per cent said they were very satisfied, 16 per cent said they were quite satisfied, 3 per cent said they were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied and the remaining 3 per cent said they were dissatisfied.
  • 68 per cent of respondents reported that the equipment/minor adaptation had made their quality of life much better, 27 per cent reported it had made it a little better, 4 per cent reported no effect, and the remaining 1 per cent of respondents reported that their quality of life was worse. These figures are unchanged from 2007-08.
  • In the cases where the user chose what equipment or minor adaptation they wanted, 79 per cent said that the equipment or minor adaptation has made their life much better. On the other hand, when the users reported that what they wanted didn't really affect what they got or when they reported they hadn't had any real choice, a much smaller percentage (35 per cent and 41 per cent respectively) indicated that the equipment or minor adaptation had made their quality of life much better.
  • 73 per cent of respondents who felt their equipment or minor adaptation had been set up and demonstrated clearly and helpfully also felt the equipment or minor adaptation had made their life much better. This can be compared to the groups of users who were not shown how to use their equipment or minor adaptation and thought they should have been (where 41 per cent said it made their life much better), or were shown but not as well as they should have been (46 per cent), or were shown but were unsure how to use it later (48 per cent).
  • 98 per cent of respondents were either very or fairly happy with the way they were treated by those who discussed their needs with them in 2009-10 and 2 per cent of the respondents were unhappy. These figures are unchanged from 2007-08.
  • 4 per cent of respondents felt the length of time they waited for their equipment or minor adaptation caused them serious problems and a further 15 per cent experienced minor problems. Over four-fifths (81 per cent) had no problems. These figures have remained the same as in 2007-08.
  • Nearly two-thirds (64 per cent) of respondents were using their equipment or minor adaptation to help look after their personal care needs in 2009-10, which is unchanged from 2007-08. Over two-fifths (42 per cent) were using it to get around within the home (up 1 percentage point), and over a quarter (26 per cent) were using it to move around outside of the home (also up 1 percentage point). A third (33 per cent) used their equipment or minor adaptation to help them have more control over their daily life (down 1 percentage point) .
  • In 2009-10, 27 per cent of respondents had no worries about their personal safety with regards to fear of falling or other physical harm which is a decrease of 1 percentage point since 2007-08, and a further 46 per cent had support to ensure they had no worries (up 2 percentage points). However, 3 per cent were extremely worried (unchanged) with the remaining 24 per cent having some worries (down 1 percentage point).
  • 78 per cent of users in the White ethnic group responded they were either extremely or very satisfied with their equipment or minor adaptation, compared to only 59 per cent of users in the Asian ethnic group.
  • A quarter (25 per cent) of respondents said they needed less help from others following receipt of their equipment or minor adaptation which is an increase of 1 percentage point from 2007-08, and nearly half (49 per cent) said the amount of help they needed had not changed (also up 1 percentage point). 8 per cent reported they now needed more help than they had before (unchanged), and the remaining 18 per cent said they did not need help from others (down 1 percentage point).
  • 65,000 out of a sample of 127,000 equipment or minor adaptation recipients responded to the survey which is a response rate of 51 per cent (55 per cent in 2007-08).

Resources

Coverage

Date Range: April 01, 2009 to March 31, 2010
Geographical coverage:
England
Geographical granularity:
Councils with Social Services Responsibilities
Country

Related links

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